Home Football Sevilla’s Pepe Castro: ‘In the Europa League this club is transformed’

Sevilla’s Pepe Castro: ‘In the Europa League this club is transformed’

471

No team have reached more European finals this century and their president explains why they have ‘bet on’ the competition

There were no fans inside the ground alongside the Rhine but still the noise was constant and as the semi-final entered the final minutes, the familiar sound of the Sevilla anthem rang round. At first it was sung by what they have started to call The Suplentes Supporters’ Club: subs, coaching staff, doctors, physios and a handful of directors, the president, Pepe Castro, included. But then, when the final whistle went, securing victory over Manchester United and a place in Friday’s Europa League final against Internazionale in Cologne, the players on the pitch joined them, everyone singing together.

The first time Castro or anyone heard the song was in his car 18 years ago. Then the vice-president, someone was waiting for him as he left work; long hair held in a wide bandana, T-shirt ripped, jeans torn. He introduced himself as El Arrebato and said he had written an anthem for Sevilla’s centenary. Send it to the club, Castro said, keen to shake off this unknown. But El Arrebato, real name Javier Labandón, insisted and that evening he was at the Sánchez Pizjuán, holding a CD.

Continue reading…No team have reached more European finals this century and their president explains why they have ‘bet on’ the competitionThere were no fans inside the ground alongside the Rhine but still the noise was constant and as the semi-final entered the final minutes, the familiar sound of the Sevilla anthem rang round. At first it was sung by what they have started to call The Suplentes Supporters’ Club: subs, coaching staff, doctors, physios and a handful of directors, the president, Pepe Castro, included. But then, when the final whistle went, securing victory over Manchester United and a place in Friday’s Europa League final against Internazionale in Cologne, the players on the pitch joined them, everyone singing together.The first time Castro or anyone heard the song was in his car 18 years ago. Then the vice-president, someone was waiting for him as he left work; long hair held in a wide bandana, T-shirt ripped, jeans torn. He introduced himself as El Arrebato and said he had written an anthem for Sevilla’s centenary. Send it to the club, Castro said, keen to shake off this unknown. But El Arrebato, real name Javier Labandón, insisted and that evening he was at the Sánchez Pizjuán, holding a CD. Continue reading…